When I first moved to Germany

When you immigrate you’ll go through some changes. And they might be hard but they will build you and make you a strong person. So don’t feel disappointed when your life is not in order. Look at it with a positive perspective because in the end it’ll pass and you become stronger and better.

When I first moved to Germany I was so busy with all the processes that I didn’t have time to think about my feelings. I thought I was ok and I thought it was not affecting me at all, but I was in ignorance. Nothing felt exciting or new. I thought I was handling it pretty well. BUT, I WASN’T. I was distracted and felt the need to communicate with my friends more than I used to. I was scared and unstable and I didn’t know it was because of all the changes. I blamed myself for it. I should’ve accepted the situation and grown with it, and handled my problems with a smile. That’s one of the most important things that I learned. Everything will pass. The hardest days and the best days will all come to an end.

Everything will pass. The hardest days and the best days will all come to an end.

Mehrsan

View of a cloudy sky with a special play of light.
View of a cloudy sky with a special play of light.© Mehrsan

The shock

When I first moved to Germany I faced a couple of new things: new weather, new culture, new language, new rules, and new people. The first thing that I felt when I moved to Germany was a lack of belonging. I didn’t belong here. It’s a natural feeling when almost everything is new. When you don’t see any familiar faces, of course, you don’t feel that you belong to the place. Adapting to all the changes made me more flexible and open-minded. Because I felt that I didn’t belong to Germany, I felt the urge to define who I am. If I’m a foreigner and far away from my home, I should know who I am and where I come from and why I’m valuable. I should be able to be proud of myself for everything that I am. After a while, I started to love Germany. I felt that one day will come when I can call this beautiful country my second home but until then I have a lot to learn about it. There are many opportunities here. If you be good enough at what you do, you can be so much more successful than you could ever be in your own country. The thing that I love about Germany is that you don’t need a lot of money in comparison to other countries with the same level of education to study here.

If I’m a foreigner and far away from my home, I should know who I am and where I come from and why I’m valuable.

Mehrsan

An old, broken bicycle is leaning against a wooden fence. Trees and houses can be seen in the background.
An old, broken bicycle is leaning against a wooden fence. Trees and houses can be seen in the background.© Mehrsan

My journey with the German language

The German language is a pain in my ass. I’m super lazy when it comes to learning German although I know the better I get at German the easier my life will be. I’m trying my best not only to learn German but also to love it. It’s been a real challenge for me. 

I had a lot of difficulties accepting the fact that I have to speak the German language. It seemed too unfair to me but it doesn’t matter. I learned if something is not fair and you can’t change it the best thing to do is to accept it, cause no one gives a shit if your situation isn’t fair, they have enough unfairness to deal with that they can’t think about yours too, the same way that you don’t care about most people’s problems. So I got over it and started trying. The rule of “if you can’t change it, ignore it.” also applies to other aspects of my life. For example, if I notice racist behavior I can ignore it or I can let it get into me. I choose to ignore it and feel sorry for the person cause the only way he could feel better than me is by his race. 

Living in Germany means speaking German and that can make everything hard. You can’t use anything you know, simply because you can’t speak the language well. You’ll miss a lot in life till you’ll be able to speak German fluently. It doesn’t matter how much you know, since you can’t speak it, it’s the same as not knowing it. In my case, I need to study basic chemistry, physics, biology, and mathematics in Studienkolleg. I’ve already studied all of it but I have to learn all that once again in German.

what doesn't kill you, makes you stronger.

Friedrich Nietzsche

The sunny old town of Frankfurt.
The sunny old town of Frankfurt.© Mehrsan

The more I get to know Germany, the happier I get about my decision to move here. moving to Germany was the best decision of my life and it was worth all the struggles. Germany has a lot to offer me and all these struggles and efforts will make me a stronger person. I love it here and all the struggles and growth that come with it. And I’m sure it’ll be my second home one day.

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