I used to ask myself: Why do people walk? Or better: How do they feel? What do they think when they are on a walk?

There is no such walking culture in Vietnam, especially in Hanoi where I come from. There is no pavement that is actually used for walking purpose, but for parking motorbikes – the most practical transportation not only in Vietnam, but also in many other Asian countries. Moreover, it is very common that the air quality in big cities is mostly unsuitable for staying out for too long. Too, is the severe weather and humidity in tropical regions. Hence, people don’t usually walk.

I, therefore, have never really “felt” my legs.

It is not until I am in the city of the 3 rivers, where there are the most amazing paths along the banks for you to walk on that I can finally answer these questions: I walk because it’s one of the fastest way to get somewhere, and because I can actually count on my own legs. Besides, I don’t walk to think, I walk to give my brain sometimes to wander and I walk to feel nothing but just the moment, and my own legs. I walk because more walking means my walking pace is increasing, while my living pace is decreasing.

I have written other words about the root and the route. To move and to walk is probably the most important thing to distinguish the two.

I walk because more walking means my walking pace is increasing, while my living pace is decreasing.

Anh-Hoang

There was a late autumn evening before the lockdown, when I was walking alone along the Inn, filling my chest with the fresh cool air from the river, when the wind was caressing my hair and the blinking quivering reflections of all the lights from the other bank created the scene of a Walt Disney cartoon. I was so humble and happily enjoying myself, not noticing the pace of my foot steps until a traffic light stopped me.

In 30 seconds waiting for the light to change color, I realised that I have been “walking” such a long way, literally and figuratively.

There are fellows that would like to share some parts of the walk with me that I really treasure. And we sometimes hold hands.
On the way, there are flowers and views that I would like to stop and admire. There are also some difficulties that make me want to stop, and quit. There are fellows that would like to share some parts of the walk with me that I really treasure. Most important, there is always an open route ahead and all I need to do is making one step after another.

The lockdown is maybe holding our steps to reach to further points in life. However, we can always just walk in order to feel nothing rather than the moment, and our own legs.

I was so humble and happily enjoying myself, not noticing the pace of my foot steps until a traffic light stopped me.

Anh-Hoang

More about Anh Hoang

Comments

Write comment

More posts by Anh Hoang

A shot from a street in Hanoi, Vietnam. You can see a lighted shop, pedestrians in front of it.
It’s easy to highlight differences, but let us consider the similarity between the people, culturally and humanly. It’s evident to discriminate, but let us find out the resemblance between two nations, respectfully and diplomatically.© DAAD/ Anh-Hoang
Bloggerin Anh Hoang
Blog post written by Anh Hoang
Accomodation+8
A bench in front of a wall, the sun is shining.
I did not even choose Passau at first, all I thought of was just to come to any place in Germany, so that I can improve my language skills. Just that. In a nutshell, it was not Passau that I chose, but it was me that Passau – the university city that chose me.© DAAD/ Anh-Hoang
Bloggerin Anh Hoang
Blog post written by Anh Hoang
Community+5
A Calendar, notes, clock and laptop on a desk
“How are you? May you blessed with happiness” written in Urdu by a dorm-mate of mine, who is also DAAD scholarship holder for her master at university of Passau.© DAAD/ Anh-Hoang
Bloggerin Anh Hoang
Blog post written by Anh Hoang
Community+4
A scene at the desk in the evening. The light is on.
All of these “was just”, because time in the end was just a few numbers show up on my phone screen after a single tap.© DAAD/ Anh-Hoang
Bloggerin Anh Hoang
Blog post written by Anh Hoang
Community+4

In line with this topic